Business Sutra: A Very Indian Approach to Management by Devdutt Pattanaik


 

 

 

 

 

 

Category: Management and Mythology
Publisher: Aleph Book Company
Publisher (French): LSWR SWL (forthcoming)
Publisher (German): LSWR SWL (forthcoming)
Publisher (Hindi): Manjul Publishing House
Publisher (Italian): LSWR SWL
Publisher (Marathi): Popular Prakashan (forthcoming)
Publisher (Tamil): Sixthsense Publishing (forthcoming)
Rights: World rights available (excluding Indian subcontinent, translation rights for French, German, Hindi, Italian, Marathi, Tamil)

In this landmark book, best-selling author, leadership coach and mythologist Devdutt Pattanaik shows how, despite its veneer of objectivity, modern management is rooted in Western beliefs and obsessed with accomplishing rigid objectives and increasing shareholder value. By contrast, the Indian way of doing business – as apparent in Indian mythology, but no longer seen in practice – accommodates subjectivity and diversity, and offers an inclusive, more empathetic way of achieving success. Great value is placed on darshan, that is, on how we see the world and our relationship with Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth.

Business Sutra uses stories, symbols and rituals drawn from Hindu, Jain and Buddhist mythology to understand a wide variety of business situations that range from running a successful tea stall to nurturing talent in a large multinational corporation. At the heart of the book is a compelling premise: if we believe that wealth needs to be chased, the workplace becomes a rana-bhoomi – a battleground of investors, regulators, employers, employees, vendors, competitors and customers; if we believe that wealth needs to be attracted, the workplace becomes a ranga-bhoomi – a playground where everyone is happy.

Brilliantly argued, original and thoroughly accessible, Business Sutra presents a radical and nuanced approach to management, business and leadership in a diverse, fast-changing and increasingly polarized world.

 

EXCERPTS FROM SOME REVIEWS:
“This book is full of frameworks, woven into each other. While frameworks of management science seek to be objective, the frameworks of Business Sutra are primarily subjective. The book does not seek to sell these frameworks, or justify them as the truth. They are meant to be reflective, and not prescriptive.” - The Hindu
http://www.thehindu.com/books/books-reviews/an-indian-view-of-management/article4689764.ece

“This isn’t a review. This book can’t be reviewed. It has to be read. Given the way Devdutt Pattanaik writes, it is great fun to read. There are nuggets here and there. Perhaps one shouldn’t call them wisdom. These are different ways of looking at things. They make you think and that’s Devdutt’s USP – to give a new twist to stuff one is already vaguely familiar with.” - Bibek Debroy
http://devdutt.com/blog/thoughts-on-business-sutra-by-bibek-debroy.html

“The book, Business Sutra attempts to answer the basic question, is there an Indian way of doing business? The central argument is that management practices today are a reflection of the western beliefs which are convergent, and uni-dimensional. The Indian ethos can be better understood through our stories, symbols and rituals. The book attempts to take different aspects of business and craft what would be an Indian approach to management.” - Times of India
http://blogs.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/just-like-that/business-sutra-by-devdutt-pattanaik/

“The book is a tour de force of Indian mythology and the relevance of various stories, rituals and characters to contemporary managers. The author is critical of modern Western thought which dismisses mythology as irrational and unscientific” - India Today
http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/dhiraj-nayyar-reviews-business-sutra-the-mythical-company/1/278976.html

“At the heart of the book is a compelling premise: if we believe that wealth needs to be chased, the workplace becomes a rana-bhoomi - a battleground of INVESTORS, regulators, employers, employees, vendors, competitors and customers; if we believe that wealth needs to be attracted, the workplace is a rang-bhoomi - a playground where everyone attains happiness.” - The Sunday Indian
http://www.thesundayindian.com/en/story/book-review-business-sutra/114/47838/